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Missile test videos impact funny bone

If you laughed when David Letterman dropped bowling balls on a waterbed and a frozen turkey on a trampoline from the top of a five-story tower, you might also find missile impact test videos entertaining.

The Airolite Co. LLC released a video about new code requirements for large missile impact tests for building louvers, which we'll publish information about in the May issues of Metal Architecture and Metal Construction News.

The Airolite Co. LLC released a video about new code requirements for large missile impact tests for building louvers, which we'll publish information about in the May issues of Metal Architecture and Metal Construction News. Depending on the type of building and location, the louvers are required to withstand a 9 pound 2-by-4 slamming into them at 34 mph or a 9 pound 2-by-4 impacting at 55 mph.

A couple YouTube searches for "large missile test" and "large missile impact test" turn up a bevy of well-staged videos of brick and metal walls, glass and other materials being struck with shooting timbers. In this 16-second example, a guy is heard exclaiming off-screen, "Taw, baby!" I thought the same thing as I paged through some of these.

Many of the missile impact test videos begin like this one from Bristolite Daylighting Systems with a still shot of the material being tested followed by a large 2-by-4 hurtling at it from off-screen. Watching these cracked me up.

Like this one of ClearShield's double sliding door suite being blasted with accelerating lumber and this one in which the StormShear faces the flying wood. This video for BASF shows the machine that shoots the 2-by-4s being loaded and this one of a United Enertech product shows 15-pound 2-by-4s splintering into a metal grate at 100 mph. Do it again. Do it again. Can you make that thing go faster?

If you find another good missile impact test video, please paste a link in the comments below so everyone can have a look.

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